FreeLensing

Being a film photographer at heart, I love exploring new tricks with my existing tools. I can get cool light effects using plastic bags around my lens or use my sunglasses, unused negatives, or pantyhose as color filters.

But the last one I played with got me completely hooked, and I am now incapable of picking up my camera without doing it.

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FREELENSING.

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It basically started as a happy accident (and those are rare: accidents in photography mainly involve dropping lenses and there is nothing happy about that), when I switched my lens too fast and didn’t realize it was not well attached before turning the camera back on. I realized that the depth of field weas altered in an uneven way, like a tilt-shift lens. It obviously made a lot of sense: the lens plane was no longer aligned with the image plane, but I never thought about it before, probably because I was brought up thinking I should NEVER EVER have the camera on with no lens on.

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It is obviously not something to do in a sand storm, but keeping the lens pretty close to the camera with one side always attached, will minimize the amount of dust that can come into the sensor. Just take your lens off and keep it almost attached, right by your camera body. Move one side forward and back, while the other side remains attached. Look at the results in your viewfinder, until you like what you see. It can take a while to get used to but the results can be lots of fun.

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